Remote Controlled Sockets in a Workshop

Remote controlled sockets or outlets in a workshop are a massive time saver and helping hand to switch things on and off without having to walk across your shop.

Watch the tips video here:

Remote Controlled Outlets / Sockets, Shop Update, Saw Blades and more! GHTL#3 [67]

Watch this video on YouTube.

Why use remote controlled sockets in a workshop?

Have you never had a situation where you’re just about to start cutting something and you realise you’ve forgotten to switch the dust extraction on? Or if, like me, you only switch your compressor on when it’s needed? Having a way to turn stuff on and off remotely is incredibly useful, even in a small workshop!

Where do I buy them?

How do they work?

You simply plug the receiver socket into the wall and plug whatever you want to control in to the socket. Do double check the current rating of the device you want to use so you. They’re VERY simple to operate. The ones I use (link above) come with 5 sockets / outlets and 2 x remote controls. The remotes have 5 buttons, numbered 1-5. The sockets each have a number of the back, 1-5. When you press button ‘1’ on the remote, socket 1 switches on… it’s pretty simple and I’m sure you get the idea. You can program them differently if you want, for example you might want to switch more than one socket on with a single button press. That’s all there is to it!

My remote sockets aren’t working!

I have had problems in the workshop where the remote controls start to become less and less responsive over time and eventually stop working completely. With mine I found this was caused by dust in my workshop. I gave the remote control a good clean out with the air gun and they’re as good as new now!

Remote controlled sockets or outlets are an amazing addition for any workshop – a real time saver and they make a huge difference to my workflow.

Andy Mac

Andy runs a busy bespoke woodworking business,making everything from custom furniture through to commercial display systems. He's been self employed most of his life, runs various YouTube channels and is co-host of the UK's first commercial joinery podcast.
Andy Mac